Tuesday, September 15, 2009

15 Cancer Symptoms Women Ignore

Wow! Please.. please take a look at this article I found on Webmd.com. You may not have any reason the believe that you have cancer, but please take this information with you for the future. You may be able to share this with someone who may have some of these symptoms. - Health Girl

WebMD uncovers common cancer warning signs women often overlook.
By Kathleen Doheny
WebMD Feature
Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD

Women tend to be more vigilant than men about getting recommended health checkups and cancer screenings, according to studies and experts.

They're generally more willing, as well, to get potentially worrisome symptoms checked out, says Mary Daly, MD, oncologist and head of the department of clinical genetics at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia.

But not always. Younger women, for instance, tend to ignore symptoms that could point to cancer. "They have this notion that cancer is a problem of older people," Daly tells WebMD. And they're often right, but plenty of young people get cancer, too.

Of course, some women are as skilled as men are at switching to denial mode. "There are people who deliberately ignore their cancer symptoms," says Hannah Linden, MD, a medical oncologist. She is a joint associate member of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and associate professor of medicine at the University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle. It's usually denial, but not always, she says. "For some, there is a cultural belief that cancer is incurable, so why go there."

Talking about worrisome symptoms shouldn't make people overreact, says Ranit Mishori, MD, an assistant professor of family medicine at the Georgetown University School of Medicine in Washington, D.C. "I don't want to give people the impression they should look for every little thing," she says.

With that healthy balance between denial and hypochondria in mind, WebMD asked experts to talk about the symptoms that may not immediately make a woman worry about cancer, but that should be checked out. Read on for 15 possible cancer symptoms women often ignore.

No. 1: Unexplained Weight Loss

Many women would be delighted to lose weight without trying. But unexplained weight loss -- say 10 pounds in a month without an increase in exercise or a decrease in food intake -- should be checked out, Mishori says.

"Unexplained weight loss is cancer unless proven not," she says. It could, of course, turn out to be another condition, such as an overactive thyroid.

Expect your doctor to run tests to check the thyroid and perhaps order a CT scan of different organs. The doctor needs to "rule out the possibilities, one by one," Mishori says.

No. 2: Bloating

Bloating is so common that many women just live with it. But it could point to ovarian cancer. Other symptoms of ovarian cancer include abdominal pain or pelvic pain, feeling full quickly -- even when you haven't eaten much -- and urinary problems, such as having an urgent need to go to the bathroom.

If the bloating occurs almost every day and persists for more than a few weeks, you should consult your physician. Expect your doctor to take a careful history and order a CT scan and blood tests, among others.

Postpartum Depression - Topic Overview

I found this article at WebMD.com. This is a condition that afflicts so many new mothers and I'm posting this article in hope that someone will realize that they may need help. Check out the checklist below.

- Health Girl

What is postpartum depression?

Postpartum depression is a serious illness that can occur in the first few months after childbirth. It also can happen after miscarriage and stillbirth.

Postpartum depression can make you feel very sad, hopeless, and worthless. You may have trouble caring for and bonding with your baby.

Postpartum depression is not the "baby blues," which many women have in the first couple of weeks after childbirth. With the blues, you may have trouble sleeping and feel moody, teary, and overwhelmed. You may have these feelings along with being happy about your baby. But the "baby blues" usually go away within a couple of weeks. The symptoms of postpartum depression can last for months.

In rare cases, a woman may have a severe form of depression called postpartum psychosis. She may act strangely, see or hear things that aren't there, and be a danger to herself and her baby. This is an emergency, because it can quickly get worse and put her or others in danger.

It’s very important to get treatment for depression. The sooner you get treated, the sooner you'll feel better and enjoy your baby.

What causes postpartum depression?

Postpartum depression seems to be brought on by the changes in hormone levels that occur after pregnancy. Any woman can get postpartum depression in the months after childbirth, miscarriage, or stillbirth.

You have a greater chance of getting postpartum depression if:

  • You've had depression or postpartum depression before.
  • You have poor support from your partner, friends, or family.
  • You have a sick or colicky baby.
  • You have a lot of other stress in your life.

You are more likely to get postpartum psychosis if you or someone in your family has bipolar disorder (also known as manic-depression).

What are the symptoms?

A woman who has postpartum depression may:

  • Feel very sad, hopeless, and empty. Some women also may feel anxious.
  • Lose pleasure in everyday things.
  • Not feel hungry and may lose weight. (But some women feel more hungry and gain weight).
  • Have trouble sleeping.
  • Not be able to concentrate.

These symptoms can occur in the first day or two after the birth. Or they can follow the symptoms of the baby blues after a couple of weeks.

If you think you might have postpartum depression, fill out this postpartum depression checklist(What is a PDF document?) . Take it with you when you see your doctor.

A woman who has postpartum psychosis may feel cut off from her baby. She may see and hear things that aren't there. Any woman who has postpartum depression can have fleeting thoughts of suicide or of harming her baby. But a woman with postpartum psychosis may feel like she has to act on these thoughts.

If you think you can't keep from hurting yourself, your baby, or someone else, see your doctor right away or call911 for emergency medical care. For other resources, call:

  • The national suicide hotline, National Hopeline Network, at 1-800-784-2433.
  • The National Child Abuse Hotline at 1-800-422-4453.

How is postpartum depression diagnosed?

Your doctor will do a physical exam and ask about your symptoms.

Be sure to tell your doctor about any feelings of baby blues at your first checkup after the baby is born. Your doctor will want to follow up with you to see how you are feeling.

How is it treated?

Postpartum depression is treated with counseling and antidepressant medicines. Women with milder depression may be able to get better with counseling alone. But many women need counseling and medicine. Some antidepressants are considered safe for women who breast-feed.

To help yourself get better, make sure to eat well, get some exercise every day, and get as much sleep as possible. Seek support from family and friends if you can.

Try not to feel bad about yourself for having this illness. It doesn't mean you're a bad mother. Many women have postpartum depression. It may take time, but you can get better with treatment.

Tuesday, September 1, 2009

Benefits of Apple Cider Vinegar

, I personally find apple-cider vinegar to work. I remember about 5 years back or more, I was working out at a gym with a juice bar and the girl there happened to be a medical student doing research on the effects of apple-cider vinegar and the reduction of carb intake --which I think effects blood sugar . She told me that if you take it before eating pasta, it diminishes some of the actual absorption. I wanna say she said something like 40 percent of the actual carb consumption is reduced. I still take it either before or immediately after eating a large carb dish and I don't feel as heavy and I noticed less weight gain. I also do this along with exercise, so maybe it's the excercise not sure.

I found this article at righthealth.com. Enjoy! -- Health Girl

Apple Cider Vinegar


Apple cider vinegar (ACV) is prepared by pulverizing apples into a slurry of juice and pulp then adding yeast and sugars.

Reports of the healing properties of apple cider vinegar date to 3300 BC. In 400 BC, Hippocrates supposedly used apple cider vinegar as a healing elixir, an antibiotic, and for general health. Samurai warriors purportedly used a vinegar tonic for strength and power. U.S. Civil War soldiers used a vinegar solution to prevent gastric upset and as a treatment for pneumonia and scurvy.

Apple cider vinegar has been used alone and in combination with other agents for many health conditions. Anecdotally, ancient Egyptians used apple cider vinegar for weight loss. During the diet "craze" of the 1970s, proponents suggested that a combination of apple cider, kelp, vitamin B6, and lecithin could "trick" the body's metabolism into burning fat faster. Claims of preventing viral and bacterial infections, as well as allergic reactions to pollen, dander and dust stem from the proposed ability of apple cider vinegar to prevent alkalinization of the body. However, there is not enough scientific evidence to form a clear conclusion about the efficacy or safety of apple cider vinegar for any health condition.

There may be long-term risks associated with the acidity of apple cider vinegar, including low blood potassium levels (hypokalemia) or diminished bone mineral density.

Evidence Table

These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.


The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.


Adults (over 18 years old)

No specific doses are supported by well-designed clinical trials. In general, 2 teaspoons of cider vinegar have been taken in 1 cup water three times daily. Also, 285-milligram tablets have been taken with meals. Topical and rectal preparations have also been used but safety is unclear.

Children (under 18 years old)

Not enough available evidence.


Many complementary techniques are practiced by healthcare professionals with formal training, in accordance with the standards of national organizations. However, this is not universally the case, and adverse effects are possible. Due to limited research, in some cases only limited safety information is available.

Caution should be exercised in patients with known allergy or hypersensitivity to apple cider vinegar or any of its ingredients, including apples and pectin.

Side Effects and Warnings

There is little scientific study of the safety of apple cider vinegar. The acidity of undiluted apple cider vinegar may destroy tooth enamel when sipped orally. Use cautiously in patients with low potassium levels or taking potassium-lowering medications. Use cautiously in patients with diabetes since apple cider vinegar may contain chromium, which may affect insulin levels. Use cautiously in patients with osteoporosis, based on one case report. Avoid sipping or drinking undiluted apple cider vinegar:

Pregnancy & Breastfeeding

Not recommended due to lack of sufficient data. Likely safe when taken orally as food flavoring. Possibly unsafe when used in larger amounts.


Interactions with Drugs

Note: Theoretical interactions are based on potential pH altering effects of apple cider vinegar. The degree to which apple cider vinegar affects blood pH is currently not established.

Theoretically, long-term oral use of apple cider vinegar can decrease potassium levels, increasing the risk of toxicity of cardiac glycoside drugs such as digoxin (Lanoxin®), adding to the potassium-lowering effects of insulin, laxatives and diuretics such as furosemide (Lasix®).

Interactions with Herbs & Dietary Supplements

Note: Theoretical interactions are based on potential pH altering effects of apple cider vinegar. The degree to which apple cider vinegar affects blood pH is currently not established.

Theoretically, long-term oral use of apple cider vinegar can decrease potassium levels. This may increase the risk of toxicity of cardiac glycoside herbs, add to the potassium-lowering effects of diuretics, and/or add to the potassium-lowering effects of laxative herbs.


This information is based on a systematic review of scientific literature, and was peer-reviewed and edited by contributors to the Natural Standard Research Collaboration (www.naturalstandard.com): Tracee Rae Abrams, PharmD (University of Rhode Island); Ethan Basch, MD (Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center); Heather Boon B.Sc.Phm, PhD (University of Toronto); Nicole Giese, MS (Natural Standard Research Collaboration); Mary Giles, PharmD (University of Rhode Island); Karta Purkh Singh Khalsa, CDN, RH (AHG) (Bastyr University); Catherine DeFranco Kirkwood, MPH, CCCJS-MAC (MD Anderson Cancer Center); Christine Park, PharmD (Northeastern University); Adrianne Rogers, MD (Boston University); Erica Rusie, PharmD (Nova Southeastern University); Joshua Sklar, PharmD (University of Rhode Island); Catherine Ulbricht, PharmD (Massachusetts General Hospital); Wendy Weissner, BA (Natural Standard Research Collaboration); Jennifer Woods (Northeastern University).


Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below. Lhotta K, Hofle G, Gasser R, et al. Hypokalemia, hyperreninemia and osteoporosis in a patient ingesting large amounts of cider vinegar. Nephron 1998;80(2):242-243. View Abstract Shindea UA, Sharma G, Xu YJ, et al. Insulin sensitising action of chromium picolinate in various experimental models of diabetes mellitus. J Trace Elem Med Biol 2004;18(1):23-32. View Abstract

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